China Labour Quarterly April 2019

Conspicuous in Spending but Miser on Workers: Chinese Enterprise Exploits Workers despite Profit Boom

Chinese enterprise Huawei Technology Co. was under fire since the arrest of its CFO Meng Wanzhou by the Canadian government and its lawsuit against the US government over the equipment ban some weeks ago. Meanwhile, the diplomatic crisis due to the arrest of Meng triggered a heated debate on whether Chinese-owned telecommunications companies are cybersecurity risks to the world. In recent years, Chinese-owned technology companies are expanding overseas.  Large-scale mergers, investment and marketing that involved big amount of money have sparked a lot of controversies, as well as issues on labour abuses and exploitations.

Read More


A Love Story Separated by High Walls

On the evening of 20 March 2019, Wei Zhili (Xiaowei), an editor of the "iLabour", an online media concerned about the rights and interests of Hunan's silicosis workers, was arrested by Shenzhen Police when he was on his way to his parents' residence in Guangzhou. The police also broke into his parents' home and searched for evidence. Xiaowei’s wife, the mainland feminist Zheng Churan (Datu), had written a post on Facebook on March 25 and expressed her concerns over her husband’s whereabouts, and asked the public to put pressure on the police station that detained Xiaowei. The post attracted significant public attention on this little love story behind bars.

Read More


HKCTU Launches Global Action Week. International Solidarity for Arrested Labour Activist in China

The Jasic labour struggle in the late July 2018 had triggered a series of crackdowns on labour movement in China. The suppression is already beyond the Jasic incident itself. Some labor activists who did not involve in the Jasic struggle and media editors who concern workers' rights were also targeted. Under the development of this situation, the HKCTU calls for global solidarity to support the detained labour activists in China.

Read More


Suffocating the civil society in China and Hong Kong: Fugitive Offenders Ordinance will extradite Hongkongers to China, where rule of law is not protected

In recent months, Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam has been pushing for the revision of Fugitive Offenders Ordinance (hereafter FOO). In just one month's time, the proposal has been tabled at Legislative Council for its first and second readings. The government explains such a proposal is a response to extradite a Hong Kong man to Taiwan, who is accused by the authorities there of murdering his girlfriend before fleeing to Hong Kong.

Read More